get-started-in-macrame

Macrame is a lot of fun to learn, and addictive.

It goes much further back in history than I was expecting, with macramé developing from 13th century Arab traditions. It started as decorative knots to secure the loose ends of woven rugs and towels and moved itself across the globe with different cultures adding their own traditional knots to the mix. Apparently macramé was a popular craft during the Victorian era, too.

So if you think a 70’s plant hanger is dated,  the 70’s is actually when modern macrame began. 

Get started with video tutorials

Certain crafts just can’t be explained well by text, or even photos. Macramé is one of them.

These videos have been a huge help in learning macramé. Even if you have no idea what the different knots are called, following the video step-by-step will give you the results. You can learn the fancy terminology later!

Basic knot tutorials

If you learn the square knot and simple finishing techniques (I’ll share another round-up with those later), you can already make plant hangers and bracelets. It’s great to start off with and gain confidence!

Spiral knots are similar to square knots, except you always knot on the same side. So if you try to make a square knot and it starts twisting, it’s because you didn’t alternate sides. (Good to know for future troubleshooting. Trust me.)

Owl tutorial

Owls are everywhere, so why not make a macramé one? The knots here get a bit more complicated, but this video is (mostly) in real-time, so you can follow along and make this cute accessory!

Learn terminology

This video uses shoestrings to exaggerate the knots, so it’s great for really seeing what’s going on. She names each of the knots, too, so if you’re eager to get all the terminology down (good for following patterns) then this video is the place to start.

A modern plant hanger

So if 70’s macrame is where the modern movement started, is this a modern modern macramé plant hanger? I’ll let you decide. I love the colourful, quirky design. Thank you to Claire for showing this to me!

Another macrame puzzle was the pronunciation of the word. Click on the American or UK flag on this dictionary page to hear how macramé is meant to be said! (Which way do you say it?)

It’ll be a while before I dare a project like Sally England’s beautiful wall hangings, but I’m gaining confidence fast.

Later this week it’s time to celebrate. Crafting Fingers has reached a big milestone this month so I’m having a blog party. Any guesses on what the milestone is?

Hint: June is the sixth month. :)

Happy crafting!
Anna

 

Header photo © Mashukesa

8 thoughts on “Get Started in Macramé”

    1. Oh that sounds like a fantastic project! Do you have photos of it anywhere? I love the look of macramé dresses but I doubt I’ll ever have that level of patience. ;)

    1. Good question! I’m sure it’s worth a try. Macramé works better with cord or twine than finer yarns, so I imagine at least jewellery wire would work well!

  1. Congratulations on your milestone!

    This was a great video round up, it’s a really enjoyable craft. As I said on twitter, I’ll be launching some new bracelets in my store using macrame which I’m very excited about.

    Claire

  2. This craft looks really fun. Anna, is it easy to do? I find myself looking forward to trying a craft, and then if it gets too difficult, I do not finish it. Bracelets sounds easy enough, maybe I will try those. Thanks for sharing and the tutorials. It is very much appreciated!

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